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Video: Moment a Southwest Airlines passenger punched a flight attendant in the face, knocking out 2 teeth

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  • A new video emerged showing the moment a Southwest Airlines passenger assaulted a flight attendant.

  • The flight attendant, seen bleeding in the video, lost two teeth as a result of the altercation.

  • The FAA said it’s been seeing a spike of aggressive behavior on airlines in recent months.

A new video has emerged of the moment a Southwest Airlines passenger punched a flight attendant in the face, knocking two of her teeth out. The incident occurred on a flight from Sacramento to San Diego on May 23 after a woman, identified as 28-year-old Vyvianna Quinonez, “repeatedly ignored standard in-flight instructions and became verbally and physically abusive upon landing,” a spokesperson for the airlines told Insider.

The video shows Quinonez, sitting in an aisle seat at the back of the plane, jumping up and hitting the flight attendant multiple times as onlookers scream. The 28-year-old keeps swinging until another male passenger intervenes, putting himself in between her and the flight attendant.

“Don’t you dare touch a flight attendant like that,” the man yells at Quinonez, who sits back down. Behind him, the shocked flight attendant is seen wiping her face as a streak of blood runs down her cheek.

Upon landing, Quinonez was taken into police custody and has been charged with felony battery,  A Southwest spokesperson said Friday that she is banned from ever flying with the airline again.

The flight attendant, who has been kept anonymous, was taken to Scripps Memorial Hospital for treatment.

“We do not condone or tolerate verbal or physical abuse of our Flight Crews, who are responsible for the safety of our passengers,” a Southwest spokesperson told Insider, adding that the company is working with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to improve safety measures for flight attendants and passengers.

Earlier this month, the FAA said it was seeing a spike of unruly and aggressive behavior on airlines. The agency proposed fines of up to $15,000 for five passengers accused of interfering with and assaulting flight attendants.

Southwest Airlines said on Friday it will not resume alcohol services on board until the end of July following the recent surge in in-flight disruptions.

“Given the recent uptick in industry-wide incidents of passenger disruptions inflight, we have made the decision to pause the previously announced re-start of alcohol service onboard June (Hawaii flights) and July,” a Southwest spokesman said.

Even though the CDC lifted the mask mandate for fully vaccinated people in many spaces, customers are still required to wear masks on commercial flights.

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Africa

Deadly bombing at restaurant packed for Christmas in Congo

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Officials in the Democratic Republic of Congo say at least six people have died in a suicide bomb attack on a crowded restaurant in the eastern city of Beni.

Police prevented the bomber from entering the building, but he blew himself up at the entrance killing himself and five other people.

Another 13 people were injured.

The officials blamed Saturday’s attack on the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a militant group said to be linked to the so-called Islamic State (IS).

So far no group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

More than 30 people were celebrating Christmas at the In Box restaurant when the bomb went off, two witnesses told AFP news agency.

Children and local officials were reportedly in the restaurant at the time.

“I was sitting there,” local radio presenter Nicolas Ekila told AFP. “There was a motorbike parked there. Suddenly the motorbike took off, then there was a deafening noise.”

After the explosion the military officer responsible for the state of emergency in the country’s east told residents to return home for their own safety.

There have been frequent clashes in Beni between the army and Islamists in recent weeks.

In November, Congolese and Ugandan forces began a joint operation against the ADF in an attempt to end a series of brutal attacks.

Authorities in Uganda say the group is behind a series of recent attacks in the country, including in the capital Kampala.

Map
Map

The militant group was formed in the 1990s by Ugandans disgruntled with the government’s treatment of Muslims, but it was routed from western Uganda and its remnants fled across the border to DR Congo.

It established itself in the eastern DR Congo and has been blamed for thousands of civilian killings there over the past decade, including in attacks on Christians.

In March the US put the ADF on its list of terror groups linked to IS. For its part, IS says the ADF is an affiliate.

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South Africa’s Tutu – anti-apartheid hero dies at 90

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Desmond Tutu, South Africa’s Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist for racial justice and LGBT rights and retired Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, has died, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa announced Sunday. He was 90.

An uncompromising foe of apartheid — South Africa’s brutal regime of oppression against the Black majority — Tutu worked tirelessly, though non-violently, for its downfall.

The buoyant, blunt-spoken clergyman used his pulpit as the first Black bishop of Johannesburg and later Archbishop of Cape Town as well as frequent public demonstrations to galvanize public opinion against racial inequity both at home and globally.

Tutu’s death on Sunday “is another chapter of bereavement in our nation’s farewell to a generation of outstanding South Africans who have bequeathed us a liberated South Africa,” Ramaphosa said in a statement.

“From the pavements of resistance in South Africa to the pulpits of the world’s great cathedrals and places of worship, and the prestigious setting of the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony, the Arch distinguished himself as a non-sectarian, inclusive champion of universal human rights.”

Tutu had been hospitalized several times since 2015, after being diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1997. In recent years he and his wife, Leah, lived in a retirement community outside Cape Town.

Throughout the 1980s — when South Africa was gripped by anti-apartheid violence and a state of emergency giving police and the military sweeping powers — Tutu was one of the most prominent Blacks able to speak out against abuses.

A lively wit lightened Tutu’s hard-hitting messages and warmed otherwise grim protests, funerals and marches. Short, plucky, tenacious, he was a formidable force, and apartheid leaders learned not to discount his canny talent for quoting apt scriptures to harness righteous support for change.

The Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 highlighted his stature as one of the world’s most effective champions for human rights, a responsibility he took seriously for the rest of his life.

With the end of apartheid and South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994, Tutu celebrated the country’s multi-racial society, calling it a “rainbow nation,” a phrase that captured the heady optimism of the moment.

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Unashamed Anti-vaxxer, Marjorie Taylor Greene owns stock in 3 major vaccine makers

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Marjorie Taylor Greene, who has boasted about being unvaccinated, owns stock in 3 major vaccine makers

  • Marjorie Taylor Greene owns stock in three major vaccine makers, financial-disclosure filings show.
  • Greene holds AstraZeneca, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson stock, each worth between $1,000 and $15,000.
  • Greene has boasted about being unvaccinated and slammed “vaccine Nazis” last month.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, who has boasted about being unvaccinated against COVID-19, owns stock in three major vaccine makers, financial-disclosure filings analyzed by Insider show.

Greene holds stock in AstraZeneca, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson, each worth between $1,000 and $15,000, according to an August 13, 2020, filing from Greene with the clerk of the House of Representatives.

The discovery was made as part of Insider’s Conflicted Congress project, which revealed that multiple US lawmakers held stock in vaccine makers as the pandemic raged in 2020.

The project found that at least 13 senators and 35 US representatives held shares in Johnson & Johnson, 11 senators and 34 representatives held shares in Pfizer, and two representatives or their spouses held shares of Moderna.

In September, Greene told Insider: “I have an independent investment advisor that has full discretionary authority on my accounts. I do not direct any trades.”

Despite her financial interest in vaccine stocks, Greene says she isn’t vaccinated and has decried those trying to make her get the shot.

In an episode of Steve Bannon’s “War Room” podcast released November 2, Greene said “vaccine Nazis” were “ruining our country.”

The issue of Greene’s vaccine assets has been seized on by Jennifer Strahan, who is running against her for Congress in Georgia’s 14th district.

Last week Strahan held a Twitter poll in which she asked, “Which of the following COVID vaccine manufacturers does @mtgreenee currently own stock in?”

She listed AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, or “all of the above” as choices.

“For those of you wondering, the correct answer is D! Our current representative rails against the vaccine, but owns stock in 3 of the 4 major vaccine manufacturers,” Strahan wrote in a follow-up tweet.

Speaking at Turning Point USA’s “AmericaFest” conference on Sunday, Greene reiterated her disdain for vaccines.

“I’m not vaccinated, and they’re going to have a hell of a time if they want to hold me down and give me a vaccine,” she said.

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