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IPOB Leader, Nnamdi Kanu Sues Kenya Government For ‘Illegally Detaining, Extraditing’ Him To Nigeria

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According to the lawsuit filed on Tuesday, there are five respondents which are the Cabinet secretary, Director of Immigration Services, Director of Criminal Investigations, Commanding Officer of Police at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and the Attorney-General of Kenya.

Germany-based Kingsley Kanu has filed a suit against the Kenyan government at the High Court of Kenya, Nairobi for its involvement in the abduction and extraordinary rendition of his brother and leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu to Nigeria.

According to the lawsuit filed on Tuesday, there are five respondents which are the Cabinet secretary, Director of Immigration Services, Director of Criminal Investigations, Commanding Officer of Police at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and the Attorney-General of Kenya.

Kanu’s special counsel in Nigeria, Aloy Ejimakor disclosed this to the media on Thursday with evidence of court documents.

The lawsuit read partly, “This petition concerns the unconstitutional and unlawful removal engineered by the respondents through abduction, denial of fair administrative action in violation of the human dignity of the subject: Nwannekaenvi Nnamdi Kenny Okwu’Kan (Mr Kanu) whose presence in Kenya was lawful and non-threatening.

“This petition seeks a declaration of rights and appropriate reliefs against the involuntary and illegal return of Mr. Kanu to Nigeria when there were substantial grounds for believing that the person would be in danger of being subjected to torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment that is prohibited  by the Constitution of Kenya and the human rights treaties in force in Kenya.

“The petitioner is a German citizen ordinarily residing in Munich within Germany. This petitioner brings this petition on behalf of his brother, Mr. Kanu.”

While speaking on the suit with BBC according to the audiotape obtained by SaharaReporters through Ejimakor, Kanu’s lead counsel in Kenya, Prof. George Wajackoyah said there are pieces of proof that the Kenyan government was culpable despite its denial of involvement.

Wajackoyah stated that Kanu cannot be tried in Nigeria because there was no due process in repatriating him to Nigeria, which made it an extra rendition, and the fact that Kanu is a British citizen and has renounced his Nigerian citizenship.

He said. “We filed a petition today (Tuesday) against the Kenyan government and various actors in this case for their unconstitutional and unlawful removal which denied our client his human rights, which was engineered by 1st to 5th respondents in the violation of human rights of Nnamdi Kanu.

“We are serving the respondents and from there, we take on. Once we filed and served, then the court will give us a date, and that should be within a very short period of time because it was served under a certificate of urgency.”

Speaking on the evidence that indicted the Kenyan government, the Kenyan lawyer disclosed, “We have copies of his passport and a stamp that he was indeed in Kenya. We also have evidence he was in his residence on a particular day. We also have material proof that he was at the airport on a particular day to meet a friend and there he was arrested. Definitely, he was kidnapped.”

Wajackoyah further told BBC, “Why on earth will the Kenyan government deport a British citizen to Nigerian territory.  Kanu has renounced his Nigerian citizenship. Extradition and extra rendition are two things. Extradition has to follow due process, you can’t just pick up somebody and throw him. That’s barbaric. It’s outlawed by international law.

“If they are trying a Nigerian national, certainly (they will win). But, if they are trying a British national, not at all. It is an abuse of the court process for the Nigerian court to try a British citizen who has no connection with Nigeria and without due process. So, I have been given instruction by his family in London and his brother in Germany to file a lawsuit against the Kenyan government.”

Culled from the Sahara Reporters

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Africa

Ugandan President Assures Country After Bomb Blast in Capital

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Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni on Sunday said the perpetrators of the bomb attack in the capital Kampala on Saturday night will be arrested.

“It seems to be a terrorist act but we shall get the perpetrators.

The public should not fear, we shall defeat this criminality like we have defeated all the other criminality,’’ Museveni tweeted.

The president said the Police were at the scene in Komamboga, a Kampala suburb, and will provide more information later as well as release guidelines to the public on dealing with possible terrorist threats.

Museveni said available information shows that three people dropped off a polythene bag, which later exploded, killing one person and injuring five others.

The blast came days after the British and French embassies here issued a security alert to their citizens, warning of a terror attack. (Xinhua/NAN)

 

 

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Africa

Cameroon Presidential Succession Looms Large in Solving Country’s Political Crises

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The eventual succession to Paul Biya, Cameroon’s president since 1982, will likely prove a critical moment for Cameroon and its overlapping political and security crises.

 

By Michelle Gavin, Guest columnist and blogger

In Cameroon, an incident last week in which a gendarme shot and killed a young child in Buea—a regional capital that has been the site of clashes between anglophone separatists and federal government forces—is the most recent outrage to make international headlines. Yet every day, the country’s civil conflict inflicts a brutal toll on the population, with surprisingly little outside attention. For five years, a deepening crisis has pit anglophone separatists against federal authorities, leading to thousands of lives lost and hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced—disrupting the education of hundreds of thousands of children in the process. Despite humanitarian appeals for assistance to Cameroon, talks regarding aid delivery often produce disappointing results, and high-level diplomatic attention to the country’s unraveling is scarce.

Clearly, the exhausted people of Cameroon deserve help and support. But the world should not overlook another element to the instability gripping the country: the uncertainty around what will happen when President Paul Biya is no longer in office. Biya, at eighty-eight years old, has held his country’s highest office since 1982, governing in a highly centralized and opaque style that has kept power and economic opportunity concentrated among elites in his Cameroon People’s Democratic Movement (RDPC). While Biya and his loyalists have attended to the window-dressing of democracy, in reality elections are manipulated exercises with foregone conclusions. Organized opposition that shows signs of being a genuine threat is met with repression and intolerance. Speculation abounds regarding who will succeed the ailing Biya, whether or not that process will be constitutional, and what role the overstretched security services—who have been charged with simultaneously defeating the separatists in the west and combatting Boko Haram in the north—might play in a jump-ball scenario. The answers will either make an already bad situation worse or orient the country toward a long and doubtlessly arduous path out of its downward spiral.

Now is the time for Cameroon’s regional and international partners to send clear messages about the costs and consequences of potential power-grabs that further degrade the institutions of the state while making explicit the support that those committed to genuine political inclusion, reform, and the rule of law can expect to receive. Importantly, those worried about Cameroon’s future cannot defer to France, whose long and complex history of influence in Yaoundé has led many observers and civil society leaders to be deeply suspicious of French motives. France’s recent support for unconstitutional, dynastic succession aimed at ensuring continuity and predictability in neighboring Chad has only heightened these concerns. Few would argue that what Cameroon needs is more of the same governance that brought the country to its current state.

This publication is part of the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Project on the Future of Democracy.

*Michelle Gavin tracks political and security developments across sub-Saharan Africa. This article first appeared in CFR.

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Africa

Kenyan running star’s husband in court over her killing

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The husband of Kenyan distance running star Agnes Tirop appeared in court on Monday as a suspect in her killing, and was remanded in custody for almost three weeks.

Ibrahim, commonly known as Emmanuel, Rotich, was arrested last week in the coastal town of Mombasa after a dramatic late-night chase.

“The suspect will remain in police custody for 20 days to enable police to complete the investigations into the murder,” Iten chief magistrate Charles Kutwa said.

“He will also be taken for mental assessment.”

Tirop, 25, was found stabbed to death in their home in Iten, western Kenya, last Wednesday, a killing that shocked the nation and the world of athletics.

The double world championships bronze medallist was considered a rising star in Kenyan athletics. She came fourth in the 5,000 metres at the Tokyo Olympics this year and broke the world women-only record in the 10km last month.

Rotich, said by police to be aged about 41, had been expected to appear in court on Friday, but the hearing was postponed as officials decided where the case against him should be held.

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